home › john knights in the news

SPOTLIGHTS:

John Knights in the news

 

 

Global Flexible Electronics Market to Reach US$25.9 Billion by 2018, According to New Report by Global Industry Analysts, Inc.
19 July 2012 | Digital Journal
by release

"Flexible electronics is an emerging field of science and manufacturing technology, which enables planting of electronic devices onto conformable plastic substrates. ...driven by the global demand for lighter and smaller electronic products that consume lesser power. Due to the fact that these devices are more shock resistant, cost-effectively manufactured, and can be flexed or bended, they have the capability of being integrated into portable devices, clothing, and packaging materials.

…Key players profiled in the report include, 3M Flexible Circuit Foundry, Applied Materials, Inc., Citala Ltd., Cambridge Display Technology Ltd., E Ink Holdings, Inc., Infinite Corridor Technology, Konarka Technologies, Inc., MC10, Inc., PARC, Versatilis, LLC, among others."

 

PARC helps drive innovation in PE
8 April 2010 | Printed Electronics Now
by David Savastano

"Today, PARC is an independent for-profit entity, having been spun out by Xerox in 2002. With its background in printing, graphics, and foundational innovation, PARC has turned its expertise to the areas of printed and flexible electronics with key successes. The company developed printed thin-film transistors utilizing amorphous silicon (a-Si) on flexible substrates as early as 1983, and in 2003, created some of the first plastic semiconductors. Today, sensors and displays are among the key areas of focus for PARC. "

 

What printed-electronics leaders are working on now
3 December 2009 | Converting Magazine Blog
by Mark Spaulding

PARC, a recent spin-off of Xerox, is working with DARPA (the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) on some pretty cool items. One is a sensor tape that measures a soldier’s accumulated exposure to the dangerous sound levels of explosions...Knights also described an X-ray detector that acts like a “reverse LCD” to help detect IEDs (improvised explosive devices). The sheet of plastic with printed electronics on it integrates imaging processing with other applications to make a useful product to protect our men and women in uniform.