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Xerox Could Blow Open Concentrating Solar Power Field With New Printer
5 April 2016 | CleanTechnica
by Tina Casey

Concentrating solar tech has been getting the stinkeye from some industry observers, with the main beefs being high complexity and high costs compared to conventional solar panels. Nevertheless, the US Energy Department has made a national showpiece out of five gigantic utility-scale thermal solar power plants, and last year the agency threw some grant dollars at Xerox’ cutting edge PARC company to work on the micro-scale, photovoltaic end of the concentrating solar field. The PARC micro-scale concentrating solar project aims at whittling down both the cost and complexity of concentrating solar power, by integrating tiny hexagonal solar elements directly into a flat panel.

 

Xerox PARC Working on Cheaper Photovoltaics
30 March 2016 | Energy Manager Today
by Carl Weinschenk

The MIT Technology Review reports that researchers at Xerox PARC are working on a digital printing process that could reduce the cost of mass producing concentrated photovoltaic systems. The process could increase efficiency dramatically by using lenses to concentrate the light onto small cells in the panel.

Solar energy is growing in low- and middle-income communities, according to GreenBiz. The organization cites a study from Kevala Research to make the claim.

 

A Xerox Machine for Super Solar Panels
Researchers at PARC are working on a way to cheaply print efficient solar cells at a large scale
25 March 2016 | MIT Technology Review
by Mike Orcutt

The technology giant that’s synonymous with photocopied documents has set its sights on highly efficient solar panels.
 
Researchers at PARC, an R&D-focused subsidiary of Xerox, say they’re developing a new digital printing process that could make it much cheaper to mass-produce concentrated solar photovoltaic systems. Such systems can dramatically increase the efficiency of solar cells by using lenses to concentrate and focus the sunlight onto small cells.

 

DARPA Picks 10 to Build Nano-based Products
7 January 2016 | Defense Systems
by George Leopold

Ten research organizations have been tapped by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop technologies and processes for assembling nano-scale building blocks for materials and millimeter-scale components.

DARPA announced the awards at the end of December under its "Atoms to Products" (A2P) initiative designed to leverage unique "atomic-scale" characteristics like much lower melting points and greater heat resistance.

Boston University, Notre Dame, HRL and PARC form a working group on optical meta-material assembly. One initiative calls for Boston University researchers to develop a technique to "spray paint" atoms with nano-scale precision to build tunable optical meta-materials for the "photonic battlefield."

 

DOE Attempts to Jump-Start Concentrated Solar
Researchers seek breakthroughs for a technology designed to make solar more efficient
26 August 2015 | Technology Review
by Richard Martin

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) announced new funding for concentrated solar photovoltaic projects.
 
Awarded under ARPA-E’s Micro-scale Optimized Solar-cell Arrays with Integrated Concentration (MOSAID) program, the money will go to 11 projects at 10 organizations, including MIT, Xerox PARC, Texas A&M, and the solar manufacturer Semprius.

 

Tiny Chiplets: A New Level of Micro Manufacturing
8 April 2013 | The New York Times
by John Markoff

"The technology, on display at PARC, is part of a new system for making electronics, one that takes advantage of a Xerox invention from the 1970s: the laser printer.

If perfected, it could lead to desktop manufacturing plants that 'print' the circuitry for a wide array of electronic devices — flexible smartphones that won’t break when you sit on them; a supple, pressure-sensitive skin for a new breed of robot hands; smart-sensing medical bandages that could capture health data and then be thrown away...

The new manufacturing system the PARC researchers envision could be used to build custom computers one at a time, or as part of a 3-D printing system that makes smart objects with computing woven right into them...if the PARC researchers are successful, they will have thrown out 50 years of Silicon Valley conventional wisdom."