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Teresa Lunt in the news

 

 

Companies Race to the Patent Office to Protect Their IT Breakthroughs
There's a patent gold rush under way as savvy companies seek to lock in the competitive advantage from their IT innovations
28 September 2012 | CIO
by Kim Nash

"Patenting a family of inventions protects you better than getting a single patent, says Lunt, who helps PARC formulate patent strategy. PARC works with clients such as Procter & Gamble and BASF to develop inventions that may be patented and also licenses patents to other companies."

 

The Next Internet? Inside PARC’s Vision of Content Centric Networking
7 August 2012 | Xconomy San Francisco
by Wade Roush

"In fact, he thinks the Internet has outgrown its original underpinnings as a network built on physical addresses, and that it’s time to put aside TCP/IP and start over with a completely novel approach to naming, storing, and moving data. Jacobson’s alternative is called Content Centric Networking, or CCN, and it’s grown into the single biggest internal project at PARC…

...And that might undermine many current business models in the software and digital content industries—while at the same time creating new ones. In other words, it’s just the kind of revolutionary idea that has remade Silicon Valley at least four times since the 1960s. And this time, PARC doesn’t want to miss out on the rewards."

 

The Internet Gets a Hall of Fame (Including Al Gore!)
Epicenter
23 April 2012 | Wired
by Ryan Singel

"The best revolutionaries eventually find themselves hailed in tributes... So it’s almost inevitable that nearly 30 years after the official birthdate of the internet, some of the net’s best-known pioneers, radicals, and troublemakers are being inducted into the Internet Society’s Hall of Fame. The inaugural group includes 33 of the net’s most influential engineers, evangelists and entrepreneurs...

Innovators: [PARC Research Fellow] Van Jacobson: When the internet began to grow in the late 80s, Jacobsen devised a flow control algorithm for TCP that allowed the network to scale and avoid congestion, which is still used today. A leader in network diagnostics and performance, he won a ACM SIGCOMM lifetime achievement award in 2001."

 

Could content-centric networking provide a profitable future?
4 April 2012 | European Communications

"When Van Jacobson has something to say, people tend to listen. His algorithms for the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) helped solve the problem of internet congestion and enabled it to survive a major traffic surge in 1988-89 without collapsing. Jacobson is currently a research fellow at PARC, the company that invented ethernet, and is warning telcos that new problems lie on the horizon.

...Thanks to the strain on their networks, telcos are well aware of the content revolution underway; however, Jacobson said the 'fixes' they have used to handle the shift will not last forever. ...The ENC has brought together a range of partners to work on PARC’s answer to this problem: content-centric networking."

 

Meshin Introduces Recall Into The Android Market
[and] 10 Questions With Meshin CEO Chris Holmes
22 February 2012 | The Droid Guy

"…Meshin have introduced another great app to the Android Market. Our Apps Editor… has his own way of reviewing apps, for me though most apps that I consider 'best' are apps that qualify as productive or business. Meshin Recall is one of those apps. It integrates with your Evernote account and all, or as many of, your calendars that you want."

"Meshin came out of PARC with their biggest chunk of funding coming from Xerox..."

 

DoD Taps PARC To Help Detect Insider Threats
PARC, famous for its innovations, will develop technology for the Department of Defense that aims to identify inside security threats, using behavioral data, social networks, and other sources.
15 February 2012 | InformationWeek
by Elizabeth Montalbano

"PARC...is spearheading a new effort called the Graph Learning for Anomaly Detection using Psychological Context (GLAD-PC). The project will leverage large-scale behavioral data sets as well as information from social networks and other sources to determine when someone inside the military could pose a security risk.

...The DoD has awarded PARC $3.5 million for its role in the project, and the technology developed could have commercial potential after it's deployed within the government."

 

Reinventing Innovation at PARC
28 July 2011 | Harvard Business Review HBR Blog Network
by Teresa Amabile and Steve Kramer

"A few weeks back, we saw firsthand a hotbed of innovation in a place that many observers had long ago given up on. Its resurrection convinces us that other organizations can do the same by creating a culture of consideration, coordination, and communication, and marrying that culture to a responsive business model. That resurgent hotbed is PARC (formerly Xerox PARC)…

Over the past several years, PARC — spun off as an independent, wholly-owned subsidiary of Xerox in 2002 — has reinvented itself as a font of innovation for Xerox and a variety of other organizations worldwide. It has delivered a stunning array of software and hardware innovations to global corporations, startups, and the U.S. government, and it does a brisk business in IP licensing.

How is it that this place, widely ridiculed 20 years ago, has revived? When we visited, we not only saw pieces of PARC's storied past, but we saw what happens there today, how it happens, and how innovation continues to thrive."

 

How PARC wants to reinvent the Internet
Structure
22 June 2011 | GigaOm
by Janko Roettgers

"Forty years later, the lab is back at it: Teresa Lunt, VP and director of the computing science lab at PARC, showed off a new networking technology dubbed Content-Centric Networking (CCN) at GigaOM’s Structure conference in San Francisco today.

…Sounds futuristic? Lunt believes that first commercial applications based on CCN could appear in the marketplace within 18 months. PARC has been busy making that happen, partnering with Samsung, releasing CCN open source code for Android and maintaining an open source community at CCNX.org."

 

Internet's next evolution: 'a Facebook without Facebook.com'
22 June 2011 | ZDNet
by Joe McKendrick

"That’s the way Teresa Lunt, VP and director of the computing science lab at PARC, describes the Internet that will be emerging within the next couple of years — driven by content and data that is completely independent of underlying systems or network points..."

 

A tour around “first church of technology” PARC [videos]
(the innovative lab that started a ton in tech)
17 May 2011 | Scobleizer
by Robert Scoble

"While there I met with several people to get a taste of what they are working on now. Visiting here is like visiting Jerusalem (home of the first church). It’s where everything seemed to start and is still filled with brilliant people."

PART ONE: Future of Networking
PART TWO: How Ethnographic research leads to new business ideas
PART THREE: Ubiquitous Computing research
PART FOUR: Keeping our Cloud Computing Safe

 

IEEE Computer Society Names Technical Achievement Winners
Five technologists who have made outstanding and innovative contributions to the fields of computer and information science and engineering or computer technology will be recipients of 2011 IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Awards.
8 March 2011 | IEEE Computer Society
by release

"Garcia-Luna-Aceves received a BS in electrical engineering from the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City in 1977, and an MS and PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 1980 and 1983, respectively. He holds the Jack Baskin Endowed Chair of Computer Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, is chair of the Computer Engineering Department, and is a principal scientist at the Palo Alto Research Center. Prior to joining UCSC, he was a center director at SRI International. He has been a visiting professor at Sun Laboratories and a principal of protocol design at Nokia. His research focuses on computer communication. Garcia-Luna-Aceves is a Fellow of IEEE, AAAS, and ACM. He holds 35 US patents, has published three books, and more than 400 journal and conference papers, and has supervised more than 30 PhD dissertations."

 

PARC's plan to stop the Internet from crashing [video]
7 March 2011 | ZDNet

"'Content distribution has reached a scale that simply doesn't work,' says Van Jacobson. The scientist and research fellow at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center talks to ZDNet's Sumi Das about Content-Centric Networking (CCN) a new technology he's developed that could make content distribution on the Net more efficient."

 

Churchill Club: PARC at 40 and the business, innovation intersection [podcast]
Between the Lines
26 November 2010 | ZDNet
by Larry Dignan

"In this latest installment of the Churchill Club podcast series, a panel talks about 40 years of the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) and innovation lessons. Over the past 40 years, PARC has made a profound impact on innovation in the Valley and beyond. The birthplace of the GUI and the Ethernet, today the halls of PARC are walked by scientists making breakthroughs in clean tech, the newest phase of networking, and other commercially impactful products. As we look forward to the next 40 years, what has changed in innovation? Have we—and even can we—learn from our past? Can business and innovation co-exist? And what is next?"

 

PARC Predicts the Future of Mobile Tech, Circa 1991
In 1991 Xerox PARC shared a vision of the future and 'ubiquitous computing' that resembles today's digital trends dominated by tablet devices and smartphones.
24 September 2010 | PCWorld
by Harry McCracken, Technologizer

"I'm spending the afternoon at PARC -- the Xerox subsidiary formerly known as the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center -- for a fascinating event celebrating the fortieth anniversary of the legendary research organization. Ethernet, laser printers, and much of the concepts and technologies in every modern graphical user interface all emerged from PARC; among the many legendary alums here today are Adele Goldberg, Alan Kay, Bob Metcalfe, and Charles Simonyi. And I just shook the hand of the man sitting next to me -- Alvy Ray Smith, a computer graphics pioneer and former PARC employee who cofounded Pixar.

...[the video] doesn't predict the iPhone-but it's still fascinating and prescient, like much of the work done at PARC over the past four decades."

 

PARC turns 40: mice, money, and the new interwebs
A place whose time has come. Again
20 September 2010 | The Register
by Gavin Clarke

"Spend enough time talking to anybody involved with PARC's present or past and at some point, they'll tell you the same thing: contrary to popular thinking, the 'ideation' phase of development is 'easy.' That takes just 20 per cent of your time. Developing that idea into a successful or desirable technology or business is the sweaty part."

 

How Context-Aware Computing Will Make Gadgets Smarter
Gadget Lab
15 September 2010 | Wired
by Priya Ganapati

"Context-aware computing is different from the simple sensor-based applications seen on smartphones today...

Researchers have been working for more than two decades on making computers be more in tune with their users. That means computers would sense and react to the environment around them. Done right, such devices would be so in sync with their owners that the former will feel like a natural extension of the latter.

'The most profound technology are those that disappear,' Mark Weiser, chief scientist at PARC and father of the term 'ubiquitous computing' told in 1991 about context awareness in machines. 'They are those that weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life.'"

 

Future of Context-Aware Computing
15 September 2010 | PCMag.com
by Matthew Murray

"In his keynote speech at the Intel Developer Forum here this morning, Intel vice president and chief technology officer Justin Rattner focused on "context-aware computing," in which devices anticipate your needs and desires and help fulfill them—before you even ask...

Context-aware computing was first described back in 1991 at PARC, and Principal Scientist and Manager of the Ubiquitous Computing Area Bo Begole joined Rattner onstage to discuss the theory and history of the movement. They admitted there hasn't been much commercial success for context-aware computing yet, but that they believed 2010 was the beginning of the mainstream adoption of the idea."

 

Make Your Outlook Inbox Smarter with Meshin [INVITES]
30 August 2010 | Mashable
by Christina Warren

"Quick Pitch: Meshin is an Outlook sidebar that organizes information contextually so that you can work faster and smarter.

Genius Idea: Using semantic technology and natural language processing, Meshin can take information from your inbox and connect it with related information on the web and conversations on social networks.

Meshin is a Xerox-funded project incubated at PARC, where the Meshin team has worked on developing semantic technologies to create what they call 'context-aware information services'. In other words, this is technology that can go beyond keyword matching and create actual meaning."

 

PARC's Teresa Lunt: 'Figuring out what is valuable for you to know right now'
26 May 2010 | Knowledge@Wharton

Teresa Lunt, who directs the computing science laboratory at the Palo Alto Research Center, is involved in a wide range of activities, including ubiquitous computing, security and privacy, and ethnography for organizational environments and technology design.

During a talk with Knowledge@Wharton at the recent Future of Publishing Conference in New York, she discussed a few of her current projects -- such as research into workplace efficiencies, a study on mobile advertising and the creation of a rich media information service for a customer in Japan.

 

Mobile recommendation service now in field trials in Tokyo
25 March 2010 | Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd.

Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. (DNP), who collaborated with PARC just 3 years ago to extend its existing publishing business with the creation of new digital media technology platform, is now running a limited user trial of the resulting mobile recommender system. They are conducting the trials in the Ginza and Yurakucho districts of Tokyo through a downloadable iPhone application called "Machireco" (literally, "city" + "recommendation"), which provides recommendations based on location, history, user likes/dislikes, time of day, and other contextual information. DNP plans to monetize the service by offering it for all smart phones later this year.

view screenshots and/or download iTunes (Japan) app here

 

PARC works on content-centric networking
Mark Bernstein, CEO of the famed facility, says content-centric networking will be hitting the market within the next couple years
16 February 2010 | InfoWorld
by Paul Krill

"PARC (Palo Alto Research Center), previously known as Xerox PARC, has been responsible for some of the greatest innovations in computing, including the graphical user interface and laser printing. PARC was spun out of Xerox in 2001 as an independent subsidiary and now is working on projects like content-centric networking."

 

2020 Vision: Why you won't recognize the 'Net in 10 years
U.S. computer scientists rethink everything about the Internet, from IP addresses to DNS to routing tables
4 January 2010 | Network World
by Carolyn Duffy Marsan

"Another radical proposal to change the Internet infrastructure is content-centric networking, which is being developed at PARC. This research aims to address the problem of massive amounts of content — increasingly multimedia — that exists on the Internet... PARC has an initial implementation of content-centric networking up and running, and released early code to the Internet engineering community in September... [Van] Jacobson says the evolution to content-centric networking would be fairly painless because it would be like middleware, mapping between connection-oriented IP below and the content above. The approach uses multi-point communications and can run over anything: Ethernet, IP, optical or radio."

 

PopSci's Future Of: PARC
10 December 2009 | Popular Science/ Discovery.com
by Baratunde Thurston

Hosted by author/pundit/comedian and The Onion editor Baratunde Thurston, each PopSci: Future Of episode examines, through in-depth interviews with maverick scientists and hands-on experience with breakthrough research and extraordinary prototypes, how important aspects of human life will fundamentally change or evolve within our lifetimes.

While the PARC technology featured in this episode highlights adding efficiency to dressing rooms and decision-making when shopping, the mirror prototype demonstrates the potential for computer vision to bridge the physical and digital worlds to enable user control, infer preferences, make recommendations, and more.

 

Company sets focus on 'information overload'
21 July 2008 | abc7news
by Richard Hart

"'Everybody's being bombarded with more information than they can digest' says Teresa Lunt. As Director of the Computer Science Lab at Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), Lunt is leading a project to create a new kind of network for information. A network that provides it only when and where you need to know it -- context-based services."