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Eric Shrader in the news

 

 

ARPA-E Awardee PARC Aims to Change the Way We Think About Batteries
22 May 2013 | ARPA-E

ARPA-E recently sat down with Dr. Eric Shrader, the principal investigator of PARC’s battery co-extrusion project, to talk innovation, reforming the electric vehicle (EV) industry, and changing the way we think about batteries.

 

Researchers Create Printed Battery That Stores 40% More Energy
15 April 2011 | Discovery Treehugger
by Jerry James Stone

"A new manufacturing process developed by Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) will increase the energy a lithium-ion battery can store by 40%. The technology is similar to that of printed solar cells...

It seems the free gift with purchase here is not going to be shaving off the cost but extending the cars range to meet our perceived driving needs. As drivers of the Chevy Volt are already reporting 1,000 miles per tank, it will be interesting to see if PARC can change the electric car industry as they did solar."

 

PARC Battery Electrode Breakthrough
1 April 2011 | Printed Electronics World

"While the solar cell application has a near-term sales opportunity, commercial application of the technology to battery electrodes is probably 2-3 years out, Elrod noted. There is further opportunity for the method in air cathodes. The current density in an air-breathing electrode is proportional to the amount of electro-catalytic surface area that is exposed to air. The PARC technology provides a directed-assembly printing method for producing a greater proportion of this 'three-phase boundary' than conventional electrode manufacturing methods—up to 10x the air-breathing surface area of conventional electrodes."

 

Squeezing More Energy Out of Batteries
A new printing process could increase battery capacity by over 10 percent.
2 March 2011 | Technology Review

"PARC has developed a new printing technology that promises to pack more energy into batteries for electric vehicles...

The biggest challenge for electric vehicles remains bringing down the size and cost of their batteries. For them to compete with conventional vehicles, some experts estimate, battery costs must come down by about 75 percent. And if the batteries could store more energy, automakers could use fewer of them, thus saving money...

The work is still at an early stage, but the basic printing concept has been proved with a method PARC developed for printing thin silver lines on solar cells; these are being commercialized by a major solar manufacturer..."

 

The Future of...Paper
Earth-friendly Paper
1 November 2008 | ZDNet [video]
by Sumi Das

"It's a possible fix for the reams and reams of paper that are printed, used briefly, and then tossed everyday. ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das takes us inside PARC where scientists are developing a way to print an image that disappears, allowing the paper to be used dozens of times."

 

Xerox plans the future of today
1 May 2008 | BBC News
by Maggie Shiels

"A rare glimpse of the future has been given by Xerox at its famed Palo Alto Research Centre...On show were a handful of innovations including re-usable paper, environmentally friendly plastic, solar power, water filtering and a cell detection method that could help save lives."

 

Xerox Shows Off Future Tech And Tries To Better Define Itself
Despite failed attempts to cash in, the company and its PARC subsidiary have several pillars of growth in mind to compete with Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce.com.
1 May 2008 | InformationWeek
by Thomas Claburn

"...partnerships serve to underscore that PARC is an independent organization, one that is helping organizations other than Xerox innovate. That has some tangential value to Xerox, as PARC's owner: Good publicity may rub off. But PARC isn't just serving Xerox by inventing technologies for outside organizations. It's also investing technologies that could drive revenue at Xerox."

 

New way to save energy: Disappearing ink
30 April 2008 | CNET News.com
by Michael Kanellos

"PARC and parent company Xerox are experimenting with a type of paper and a complementary printer that would produce documents that fade away after 16 to 24 hours. Users don't have to wait for the paper to fade either. By running it through the special printer made for this paper, the printer will erase the old image before putting the new one on."

 

PARC shows off research projects beyond its Xerox work
29 April 2008 | VentureBeat
by Dean Takahashi

"Mark Bernstein, head of PARC, says the R&D center...is determined to commercialize its inventions through its business groups and leverage its 165 researchers. Xerox spun out PARC in 2002....[and] funds only about 50 percent of the work. The rest is financed through licenses to other corporations, research partnerships with big companies, and government grants."

 

Xerox Showcases Erasable Paper, Smart Documents
29 April 2008 | PC World
by Agam Shah

"Xerox's research arm Monday showcased its latest innovations, including erasable paper and tools that make documents 'smart' by adding a deeper meaning to words and images. ...The laboratory, with other Xerox research facilities, is now trying to help its parent company and other start-ups by focusing on printing and other innovations to access, use and secure electronic documents."

 

...PARC Opens Its Doors
29 April 2008 | PC Magazine
by Marty Orgel

"...PARC allowed reporters a rare look at new technology it is developing...including a copy machine paper that..does not use any ink or toner to put words onto the paper, ...a new way to capture and use solar energy and a laser-based medical scanner to detect rare or potentially damaging cells in human blood instead of using invasive and potentially dangerous biopsies."

 

Do We Need Reusable Paper?
Xerox's famed Palo Alto Research Center previewed a printing technology that lets a printed page be reused.
28 April 2008 | InternetNews.com
by Andy Patrizio

"How many times have you printed out a document on a sheet of paper, used it once, and tossed it out? According to PARC, 44.5 percent of the time that's exactly the fate of a printed page. That's a waste of more than just the paper, but the power used to create it..."

 

Seeing the first Ethernet cable (and reusable paper) at...PARC
28 April 2008 | Scobleizer.com
by Robert Scoble

"The President of PARC, Mark Bernstein, gave me a tour around the famous lab where so much of our world was invented. We started at the first Ethernet cable in the world."

 

Printed documents may self-erase in future
'Erasable paper' can be reused, reduces waste
1 January 2008 | Palo Alto Online
by Joyce Tang

"Printed matter is literally disappearing at Palo Alto Research Center, Inc. (PARC). In partnership with Xerox Research Centre of Canada since early 2004, PARC scientists have been developing 'erasable paper,' temporary documents that self-erase within a matter of hours."

 

Xerox's Erasable Paper Project
17 January 2007 | Black and White
by John Eastman

Xerox Corporation's erasable paper is a "collaborative effort with Palo Alto Research Center, PARC and the Xerox Research Centre in Canada. [PARC] began to look at work-studies of how people use their documents in the office and that was where we really began to realize that actually people don't keep what they print for very long."