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Bob Street in the news

 

 

FEDC and PARC Develop World’s Largest Flexible X-ray Detector
The prototype uses a-Si technologies on a flexible substrate and the flexible x-ray sensor was coupled to a tablet device for control and image viewing
7 January 2016 | The OSA DIRECT Newsletter
by Editor

The Flexible Electronics and Display Center (FEDC) and PARC recently announced that they have successfully manufactured what they claim to be the world's largest flexible x-ray detector prototypes using advanced thin film transistors (TFTs) - based on a-Si technology.

 

World’s Largest Flexible X-ray Detector
31 December 2015 | Printed Electronics WORLD

The Flexible Electronics and Display Center (FEDC) at Arizona State University and PARC, a Xerox company, announced that they have successfully manufactured the world's largest flexible X-ray detector prototypes using advanced thin film transistors.
 
Measuring 10 diagonal inches, the device has been jointly developed at the ASU center and PARC in conjunction with the Army Research Lab and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The device will be used to advance the development of flexible X-ray detectors for use in thin, lightweight, conformable and highly rugged devices.
 
“This success came from a rewarding collaboration that combines FEDC’s flexible array fabrication technology and PARC’s experience with digital x-ray systems,” said Bob Street, PARC Senior Research Fellow.

 

U.S. Patents Awarded to Inventors in California
20 March 2011 | TMCnet

"PARC has been assigned a patent (7,897,439)...for an 'electronic device with unique encoding.' The abstract of the patent published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office states: 'An electronic device comprising a thin film transistor (TFT) array and manufacturing methods thereof according to various embodiments. Jet-printed material is deposited on selected partially formed transistors to form completed transistors... Such uniquely encoded devices have applications for encryption, identification and personalization of electronic systems.'"

 

What PARC Will Do with Its Next 40 Years
IT Infrastructure
27 September 2010 | eWeek
by Chris Preimesberger

"In human terms, the Palo Alto Research Center is in middle age, but it continues to invent important things with youthful vigor..."

 

Innovation PARCs here
Palo Alto Research Center that paved way for PCs in the '70s is far from fading, but now looking to solar and other new technologies
22 September 2010 | San Jose Mercury News
by Troy Wolverton

"While acclaimed for inventing the laser printer, the desktop interface for PCs and the idea of 'ubiquitous computing' that paved the way for the PalmPilot and iPad, PARC isn't mired in the past. If anything, PARC, which was spun off from Xerox in 2002, has a broader mission today...

'PARC has not just survived but it's absolutely thriving,' said Paul Saffo, a longtime valley watcher and the managing director of foresight at San Francisco-based Discern Analytics. 'It's a vibrant organization that is still helping reinvent the future. ...An astounding number of the foundational ideas for Silicon Valley came out of PARC,' Saffo said."

 

AIP awards Industrial Physics Prize to inventor of digital x-ray detector
Robert Street of PARC recognized for key medical imaging technology
30 October 2009 | American Institute of Physics

"The American Institute of Physics (AIP) is awarding the 2010 Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics next month to Robert Street of PARC. Street's pioneering work at PARC in the early 1990s led to the development of flat-panel digital X-ray detectors, a commercially available technology that has replaced traditional film X-ray machines for many medical applications. His current research explores finding novel low-cost and large-area electronics for applications ranging from new flat panel displays to radiation sensors. Projects he has been involved with in recent years include ink-jet printing of organic electronic devices, constructing flexible electronic displays, developing technology for truck-size scanners for homeland security, and researching new solar cell structures."

 

Manufacturing progress key to flexible electronics' success
1 May 2007 | Small Times
by Tom Cheyney

"Surface roughness is still an issue with flex and is not good enough for making transistors,' explains Bob Street, senior research fellow at Palo Alto Research Center. ...Pointing out the susceptibility of flexible substrates to scratching, Street says the plastics people 'need to learn how to improve quality.'"