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Tamara St. Claire in the news

 

 

The Next Internet? Inside PARC’s Vision of Content Centric Networking
7 August 2012 | Xconomy San Francisco
by Wade Roush

"In fact, he thinks the Internet has outgrown its original underpinnings as a network built on physical addresses, and that it’s time to put aside TCP/IP and start over with a completely novel approach to naming, storing, and moving data. Jacobson’s alternative is called Content Centric Networking, or CCN, and it’s grown into the single biggest internal project at PARC…

...And that might undermine many current business models in the software and digital content industries—while at the same time creating new ones. In other words, it’s just the kind of revolutionary idea that has remade Silicon Valley at least four times since the 1960s. And this time, PARC doesn’t want to miss out on the rewards."

 

Cassidy: PARC still in the business of innovation 10 years after Xerox spinoff
12 July 2012 | San Jose Mercury News
by Mike Cassidy

"PARC, once known as Xerox PARC, was spun out as a subsidiary of Xerox in 2002. For the past decade it's been responsible for its own bottom line, and it's been expected to turn a profit. It was a change from the days that PARC served one master: Xerox. Now, Hoover says, less than half the lab's work is for Xerox; the rest involves projects for other companies and government agencies. …PARC's independence means that its 180 scientists and technologists can't simply come up with ideas that are world-shattering, mind-bending and brilliant. A good portion of them have to be things that PARC and companies working with PARC can sell -- and in the near-term. Profit vs. blue-sky research: It's one of the oldest balancing acts among the research lab crowd.

...All that said, Hoover is determined to make sure that PARC researchers keep reaching for the next big thing that nobody has thought of yet. Yes, the lab has identified core areas that guide its research, including health and wellness, big data, cleantech, printed electronics, networking and innovation services. But, Hoover says, as much as 25 percent of its research investments are spent on projects outside the core areas, allowing scientists to stumble onto unforeseen breakthroughs."

 

PARC, 10 Years After Xerox Spin-Off, Says It's All About Innovation
14 May 2012 | Forbes
by Connie Guglielmo

"Its clients include big names like Samsung, Procter & Gamble, Panasonic, Motorola and Honda, the U.S. government and a bevy of startups, some of whom it has spawned or invested in. Last year, 40 percent of its deals were with startups, up from 12 to 15 percent just three yeas ago.

In addition to 200 researchers  including ethnographers who study people and their problems to understand how technology can actually work on their behalf – Hoover also manages a business development and marketing team of about 20 people who work with those researchers to identify potential projects and inventions with market potential."

 

PARC showcases business models, not products, at 10 year anniversary
29 April 2012 | Ars Technica
by Nathan Mattise

"The message of the day was clear with the first words to greet guests at the registration table (via both conference workers and a commemorative bookmark). 'Just wanted to let you know, "Xerox PARC" is so 10 years ago. Today, we're "PARC, a Xerox company".' 

PARC's Power of 10 is a year-long series of events, including public-friendly guest presentations and this half-day conference, to commemorate the company's first ten years of independent operation. In 2002 Xerox incorporated PARC as an independent, wholly owned subsidiary, shifting the R&D pioneers toward an open innovation business model that took center stage on Thursday.

...Chesbrough's point was best emphasized after his presentation. The rest of the afternoon featured panels with representatives from a few PARC-collaborators. They all shared their projects, but the most eye-catching were Nicole Tricoukes, Senior Maverick at Motorola Solutions, and Davor Sutija, CEO of Thin Film." 

 

The Comeback of Xerox PARC
...Xerox's R&D subsidiary has a new strategy for innovation: make money.
21 December 2011

"PARC, which once served only Xerox, now has an expanding list of technologies in development with outside partners that include Fujitsu, Motorola, NEC Display Solutions, Microsoft, Samsung, SolFocus, and Oracle. The change in strategy has helped turn it from a multimillion-dollar financial sinkhole into a modest, but growing, innovation business.

For PARC, the partnerships are signs that open innovation is working. 'There are plenty of great ideas at PARC, but you learn early on that execution is often the hard part—execution and timing,' says St. Claire. '...You almost have to be as innovative in the commercialization—especially when you have game-changing technologies—as on the technology side.'"

 

Thin Film, PARC tip printed 'CMOS' memory
21 October 2011 | EE Times
by Peter Clarke

"...produced a working prototype of a printed ferroelectric polymer non-volatile memory that is addressed with p- and n-type organic circuits, the equivalent of CMOS circuitry.

The companies claimed that the combination of Thin Film's printed memory and PARC's organic addressing regime is the key to producing roll-to-roll printable memory that can be used in the Internet-of-Things where everything has an IP address and is connected to the Internet via a smart tag. Such smart tags require rewritable nonvolatile memory that is low cost and supports integration with sensors and other electronic components, which this technology supports, the companies said.

...The prototype will be publicly demonstrated at PARC on Monday, Oct. 24, in conjunction with a visit from the Norwegian Minister of Trade and Industry, His Excellency Trond Giske."

 

Printable transistors usher in 'internet of things'
Billions of systems, printed dirt cheap
21 October 2011 | The Register
by Rik Myslewski

"Thinfilm and PARC's breakthrough is a technology that can print not only memory onto, well, thin films, but can now also print transistors to address and manage that memory.

…Up until Friday's announcement, Thinfilm's non-volatile, ferroelectric memory was completely passive – it just sat there, holding those 20 bits in its memory cells. To be rewritten or read, it needed to be accessed by an external device which used one access pad for each memory cell. What Thinfilm and PARC have now developed is the ability to print not only the memory cells, but to also print the logic onto the same substrate needed to manage those memory cells.

…Thinfilm and PARC aren't working in a vacuum. 'There are a number of companies, [Thinfilm CEO] Sutija told us, 'that have been working on printed sensors, printed power sources, printed displays, and we're going to be active in build an ecosystem with these other partners to be able to then create integrated products.'"

 

New printed chip could spark cheaper sensor networks
21 October 2011 | GigaOM
by Stacey Higginbotham

"Thin Film Electronics ASA...has developed a way to add computing to its circuits through a partnership with Xerox PARC. This means it can offer thin, disposable tracking tags for a few cents apiece, and it could soon provide a valuable component for the Internet of things.

Thin Film is an Oslo-based company that has been in business since the mid-90s. It has been manufacturing thin-film memory chips that provide about 20 kilobytes of storage, which were used in toys and games. But thanks to its partnership with PARC it has added transistors to its circuits, which gives the chips a soupcon of intelligence — enough to perhaps track inventory or send environmental data from a sensor back to the network. It has also added a bit more memory.

…A low price is important, because it makes the technology far more accessible than RFID or other technology that today is used for tracking high-value inventory. RFID chips are built on silicon and can cost a few dollars, so aren’t practical for everyday items."

 

Reinventing Innovation at PARC
28 July 2011 | Harvard Business Review HBR Blog Network
by Teresa Amabile and Steve Kramer

"A few weeks back, we saw firsthand a hotbed of innovation in a place that many observers had long ago given up on. Its resurrection convinces us that other organizations can do the same by creating a culture of consideration, coordination, and communication, and marrying that culture to a responsive business model. That resurgent hotbed is PARC (formerly Xerox PARC)…

Over the past several years, PARC — spun off as an independent, wholly-owned subsidiary of Xerox in 2002 — has reinvented itself as a font of innovation for Xerox and a variety of other organizations worldwide. It has delivered a stunning array of software and hardware innovations to global corporations, startups, and the U.S. government, and it does a brisk business in IP licensing.

How is it that this place, widely ridiculed 20 years ago, has revived? When we visited, we not only saw pieces of PARC's storied past, but we saw what happens there today, how it happens, and how innovation continues to thrive."

 

We want to invent the next killer app
[invited/ guest contributed]
12 May 2011 | Front End of Innovation
by Tamara St. Claire

I can’t tell you how many times we’ve heard this... Because most companies have incremental and next-generation innovation down – it’s the disruptive, non-core, 'next big thing' innovation that eludes many and presents the most challenges. Yet this type of innovation is a necessity for any business that wants to access new markets, create a new line of revenue, or re-invent themselves in anticipation of future directions. So here’s my question: what happens AFTER you conceive the next killer app for your industry?

 

Thinfilm's financial report first quarter 2011
10 May 2011 | Reuters
by press release

"BUSINESS REVIEW In the first quarter, Thinfilm passed its first milestone towards creating integrated systems and introduced the OBA demo game powered by printed rewritable memory.

...'Activities with PARC have generated significant interest from both prospective customers and technology companies to link printed components, such as electrochromic displays, thin-film batteries, and sensors with Thinfilm memory,' [Thinfilm CEO Davor] Sutija continues."

 

Executives Call for More R&D
29 April 2011 | Internet Evolution
by Michael Singer

"Research and development is under budgetary pressures these days, and yet more and more executives are touting its benefits. Why is there a disconnect? And what can be done about it?

The primary issue around R&D spending is that by itself, research and development doesn't guarantee profitability. Companies must weigh how much they are willing to invest in future innovations that may never pan out.

During the Internet Evolution Radio program this past week, Dr. Steve Hoover, CEO of the Palo Alto Research Center, noted that companies need to really prioritize research and development projects based on their long-term investments."

 

PE Europe 2011 Highlights New Opportunities, Needs for Market
6 April 2011 | Printed Electronics Now
by David Savastano

“The design, which combines Thinfilm’s memory technology with PARC’s printed transistor technology, allows compact higher-density printed memories and enables new applications, including integration with other printed elements, such as sensors, power sources, and antennas. The prototypes for the addressable memory will be ready during 2011. Transfer to production is expected in 2012. There are significant horizontal markets, markets that meet the needs of a wide variety of industries, waiting for this technology to be ready.”

 

Thinfilm & PARC extend printed electronics commercialization engagement
By working together to further co-develop Addressable Memory technology, PARC and Thinfilm are complementing each other
5 April 2011 | Printed Electronics World
by company release

"PARC and Thinfilm's collaboration on next-generation printed memory solutions kicked off last year with joint design of Thinfilm 128-bit Addressable Memory, which combines Thinfilm's unique non-volatile memory technology with PARC's printed CMOS transistor technology. Given the success of the initial design phase, this next phase extends the engagement to prototyping the product for manufacturing readiness."

 

Thinfilm, PARC Extend PE Commercialization Engagement
4 April 2011 | Printed Electronics Now
by company release

"Thin Film Electronics ASA (Thinfilm) and PARC, a Xerox company, announced that they have entered the next phase of their co-innovation engagement."

 

PARC, a Xerox company, takes minority stake in Thinfilm
25 March 2011 | Printed Electronics World
by Thinfilm release

"Thin Film Electronics ASA ('Thinfilm') is a publicly-listed Norwegian technology company with its head office in Oslo and product development in Linköping, Sweden. Thinfilm is a pioneer in the field of Printed Electronics, and provides fully-printed non-volatile, rewritable memory for applications in toys & games, logistics, sensor, and ID systems...

Using printing to manufacture electronic memory makes it possible to reduce the number of process steps, resulting in dramatically lower manufacturing costs, and also reduced environmental impact as compared to traditional semiconductor processes."

 

Managing Research as an Investment Portfolio: Lessons from PARC
[invited/ guest contributed]
16 February 2011 | Xconomy SF
by Lawrence Lee

As part of its transformation from an internal research center to a commercial business, PARC has needed to innovate its business practices, as well as its research and technology. How do we balance the seemingly conflicting goals of long-term research vs. short-term profits, of creating breakthrough innovations vs. providing client services, of diversifying research into many markets vs. developing critical mass in just a few?

 

Silicon Valley tech innovator PARC celebrates 40th anniversary
Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center has been an ever-evolving lesson in how corporations can and should manage R&D.
29 September 2010 | LA Times
by Michael Hiltzik

"Institutions, like human beings, often treat their 40th birthdays as occasions for mid-life stock-taking. So it's not surprising that the 40th anniversary celebration at PARC last week was devoted as much to looking ahead to the future as to looking back at its fabled history...

I've been a close observer of PARC for more than a decade. That's not only because it's been that long since I wrote 'Dealers of Lightning,' a book about the place, but because PARC has been an ever-evolving lesson in how corporations can and should manage R&D — not only the innovations that play to their core markets, but those they can't exploit themselves."

 

What PARC Will Do with Its Next 40 Years
IT Infrastructure
27 September 2010 | eWeek
by Chris Preimesberger

"In human terms, the Palo Alto Research Center is in middle age, but it continues to invent important things with youthful vigor..."

 

PARC Turns 40: The 'Oldest Startup' Preps for the Future
23 September 2010 | PCMag
by Mark Hachman

"It's not that far-fetched to say that as PARC celebrates its 40th anniversary this week, so too does Silicon Valley...

As one of the centerpieces of Silicon Valley, PARC has driven and reacted to change, inspiring and being inspired by generations of startups. We sat down with Tamara St. Claire, vice president of global business development for PARC, to find out how PARC has moved from a research house to an 'innovation center,' and on what technologies PARC is placing its bets."

 

PARC celebrates its 40 years of Silicon Valley innovation
23 September 2010 | CNET News
by Daniel Terdiman

"Most people who spoke up on the topic seemed to agree that the secret sauce that made PARC so successful was its highly talented employees."...

"These days, eight years after its 2002 spin-off, PARC is no longer serving Xerox exclusively but is still very much in the middle of the future of technology. According to Tamara St. Claire, PARC's vice president of global business development, the research hub is deep into clean tech, biomedical engineering, and natural language processing, among others, and counts among its clients Microsoft, Dai Nippon Printing, Sun/Oracle, Samsung, NEC, and Fujitsu. Many of its other high-profile clients prefer to keep their relationship with PARC secret so as not to tip off competitors, St. Claire said."

 

PARC turns 40: mice, money, and the new interwebs
A place whose time has come. Again
20 September 2010 | The Register
by Gavin Clarke

"Spend enough time talking to anybody involved with PARC's present or past and at some point, they'll tell you the same thing: contrary to popular thinking, the 'ideation' phase of development is 'easy.' That takes just 20 per cent of your time. Developing that idea into a successful or desirable technology or business is the sweaty part."