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Janos Veres in the news

 

 

Turning the Corner to Manufacturing's Wide Open Future in Wearable Electronics
12 June 2014 | Advanced Manufacturing Insight
by Ryan Brinks

High-tech challenges and opportunities await. And while manufacturers are a step ahead of the public, they too are wrestling with what exactly that near future will look like.

On the heels of pioneering electronic wearables like the Google Glass eyewear, Fitbit physical activity bands and Pebble smartwatches are legions of ideas hoping to discover the market’s sweet spot.

One company at the center of industry collaboration envisions smart bandages that monitor people’s health, diagnose their issues and even treat their illnesses.

 

 

NASA wants to print a spacecraft, but first it’s printing the electronics
Researchers at PARC, home of the laser printer, are working on printing sensors that could flutter about on the surface of Mars to collect environmental data.
20 August 2013 | GigaOM
by Signe Brewster

"PARC — home of the laser printer, ethernet, the graphical user interface and the Alto computer — is best known for its role in Silicon Valley’s past. But in late July, a window in the belly of the center’s Palo Alto campus provided a look at the future: printable electronics that could someday go into space.

The window led to PARC’s clean room, where bodysuit-protected researchers milled about while a printer the size of an office copy machine whirred. For three or four months now, a PARC team has been working with NASA on printing heat and light sensors that would be ideal for environmental sensing on the surface of Mars. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory lead researcher Kendra Short said that eventually they’ll be able to print other types of electronics that take in solar energy, communicate wirelessly and more."

 

Robert Scoble Visits PARC -- Inkjet Printed Circuits
29 July 2013 | Scobleizer
by Robert Scoble

"Today's trip to PARC, a Xerox company was awesome...but here's the coolest thing I saw. They are printing electronic circuits in what amounts to a big inkjet printer.

...What did I take away from the visit...? Easy: Innovation hasn't stopped yet.

...Read more about the printed circuits they are designing (as you can see, they are flexible and low cost to make -- first uses will be little electronic ID tags that can be printed on shipping labels. Imagine wine shipments that will arrive and will say 'this shipment never got too hot or cold on its trip here')."

 

At Stanford, 3-D printing breaks new ground
Researchers use advancing technology to re-imagine how things are made
5 July 2013 | Palo Alto Weekly
by Elena Kadvany

"Janos Veres, who manages PARC's printed electronics team, is excited about adding intelligence and functionality to products. 

'When you think about it like that, the potential of this is way beyond being able to make just a smart label. ... You look back at the early days of computing, (when) people weren't exactly sure what computers could do for you. Is it really going to go in your mobile phone? Is it really going to go into your eyeware? And now it has.'"

 

Coming to a printer near you: Electronics manufacturing
At PARC, researchers are developing a new technology for printing everything from transistors to smart labels to semiconductors
31 May 2013 | CNET
by Daniel Terdiman

"Got a large roll-to-roll printer that you're not sure what to do with? You might have a future in electronics manufacturing.

It's still very early days, but researchers at PARC have been taking significant strides in developing a new technology that makes it possible to print electronic components like sensors, transistors, light-emitters, smart tags, flexible batteries, memory, smart labels, and more."

 

Researchers at PARC give us a glimpse of the future
25 April 2013 | San Jose Mercury News
by Patrick May

"It was a high-tech speed-dating session, Silicon Valley-style:

I would sit in the storied memorabilia-laden Room 2306 in the bowels of PARC, the former Xerox research and development center in Palo Alto that gave us the 'ball' mouse, the Ethernet, and the graphical user-interface that inspired the Apple Macintosh. And seven of PARC's resident geniuses would drop by and in 15-minute bursts blow my mind with the technical wizardry each was working on to someday transform our lives."

 

UC Berkeley, PARC, Thinfilm Electronics pursue printed sensors with FlexTech Alliance grant
22 August 2012 | Solid State Technology

"An integrated printed sensor system is under development with a new grant from FlexTech Alliance, which supports displays and flexible, printed electronics. The project leverages commercial development work currently underway between PARC and Thinfilm Electronics on designing a printed sensor platform and will integrate temperature sensing as well as assess an oxygen sensor being developed at the University of California at Berkeley.

Earlier this year, Thinfilm Electronics and PARC won the FlexTech Alliance Innovation Award for the world's first working prototype of a printed, non-volatile memory device addressed with complementary organic circuits, the equivalent of CMOS circuitry."

 

3D manufacturing: Print me a phone
New techniques to embed electronics into products
28 July 2012 | The Economist

"Printing electronics is not new; screen printing, lithography, inkjet and other processes have long been used to manufacture circuit boards and components. But the technologies are improving rapidly and now allow electronics to be printed on a greater variety of surfaces. In the latest developments, electronics printing is being combined with 'additive manufacturing', which uses machines popularly known as 3D printers to build solid objects out of material, one layer at a time...

[PARC] is developing ways to use such inks. These can print circuits for various components, including flexible display screens, sensors and antennae for radio-frequency security tags. With the emergence of additive-manufacturing techniques, it starts to become possible to print such things directly onto the product itself, says Janos Veres, the manager of PARC’s printed-electronics team."

 

Thinfilm Pairs Up With Packaging Giant Bemis To Create Labels That Know Things
10 July 2012 | Forbes
by Connie Guglielmo

"Thinfilm Electronics moved a step closer to making the 'Internet of Things' a reality, announcing a deal with U.S. packaging giant Bemis Co. today to create a printed electronics system for consumer product, healthcare and food companies who want to tag, track and collect information wirelessly about the products they ship.

What does that mean exactly? Thinfilm has been working on low-cost sensor tags containing rewritable memory that can be placed on anything...and that can collect a bevy of information.

...Thinfilm, which paired up with Xerox’s PARC R&D spin off to help develop its printed electronics technology, has already been working on creating 'inexpensive, integrated time-temperature sensors for use in monitoring perishable goods and pharmaceuticals'. The deal with Bemis builds on that work to create a 'customizable sensor platform' that Bemis can adapt for its customers. Thinfilm and Bemis said they plan to make the Bemis Intelligent Packaging Platform available next year."

 

The Internet of things is coming to a grocery store near you
9 July 2012 | GigaOM
by Stacey Higginbotham

"Thin Film Electronics, a company that makes wafer-thin printed circuits that can be built into packaging materials, and Bemis, a manufacturer of both consumer products and wholesale packaging, have signed an agreement that will add circuits to your cereal box. Or maybe sensors to your salad bags. Or digital intelligence to disposable diapers.

The Oslo-based Thinfilm has been in business since the mid-90s. It has been manufacturing thin-film memory chips that provide about 20 bits of storage, which were used in toys and games. But it has been adding more memory and has a partnership with Xerox PARC that added transistors to its circuit, thereby giving its chips enough intelligence to track inventory or send environmental data from a sensor back to the network. ...the idea of smarter circuits that are still cheap enough to be used in packaging are integral to creating an internet of things."

 

New revolution coming to electronics technology
20 May 2012 | San Jose Mercury News
by Troy Wolverton

"For decades, digital technology has been synonymous with silicon. But maybe for not much longer. The age of printed electronics may soon be upon us. Following years of hype and development, technologies that allow chips and other electronic components to be made using techniques akin to inkjet printing -- rather than by lithography or other standard methods -- may finally be reaching maturity...

Part of the challenge the industry faced was that it was developing individual components, said Davor Sutija, Thinfilm's CEO. While the components might cost less than their silicon-based counterparts, the cost advantage was often lost when they were combined with other parts. But by using technology pioneered by PARC and teaming up with other printed electronics companies, Thinfilm has developed a way to connect and combine components to create a complete printed system."

 

The age of flexible electronics is upon us
16 April 2012 | VentureBeat
by Dean Takahashi

"It has taken decades to reach this point because it requires the invention of new semiconductor manufacturing technologies, which have to be reused in ways that apply to the new kinds of materials. The good thing is that putting a little bit of electronics into flexible or wearable materials can result in a lot of new applications that don’t cost all that much to build. Flexible electronics is still looking for home-run applications, but it’s not as pie-in-the sky as it sounds. The manufacturing has improved to the point where simple memory devices cost just pennies."

 

Flexible displays bend what's possible for computers
..."Just one word. Plastics," he whispers. "There's a great future in plastics."
5 April 2012 | USA Today
by Jon Swartz

"Until then, flexible displays will be visible in smaller, more modest designs such as smart security tags, shelf and food labels, and loyalty cards with memory, says Janos Veres, who manages the printed electronics team at PARC. 

PARC, the storied research center that inspired many of the features in the original Macintosh computer, is tinkering with plastic memory, chips on consumer goods packaging, sensors on helmets, and more.
One project is a wearable patch with sensors to monitor a patient's heart rate, temperature and blood pressure. PARC is also looking at the concept of a flexible battery to save energy and space, Veres says."

 

Progress in Printed Electronics: An Interview with PARC’s Janos Veres [podcast]
31 January 2012 | ElectroIQ
by Pete Singer, Solid State Technology

"PARC is a pioneer in the development and commercialization of thin film transistors, circuits, and sensors. With a 40 year history of commercial innovation, PARC scientists have a deep knowledge of printing technology applied in domains such as displays, image sensors, and medical sensors, PARC's technical expertise and facility support printed dielectrics, nanoparticle metals, organic, oxide, and silicon (amorphous, polycrystalline, printed nanowire) semiconductors. Solid State Technology editor Pete Singer caught up with Janos Veres, area manager for printed electronics in the electronic materials and devices laboratory at PARC."

 

Printed Stickers Designed to Monitor Food Temperatures
Effort aims to merge technology from four companies to create the first sticker with all-printed electronics.
30 January 2012 | Technology Review
by David Talbot

"A plastic temperature-recording sticker that could provide detailed histories of crates of food or bottles of vaccine would be the first to use all-printed electronics components—including memory, logic, and even the battery. The cost per sticker could be only 30 cents or less.

Thin Film Electronics, based in Oslo, Norway, aims to marry the company's printed memory with printed transistors from PARC in Palo Alto, California; a printed temperature sensor from PST Sensors, a spin-off from the University of Cape Town in South Africa; and a printed battery from Imprint Energy, a spin-off from the University of California, Berkeley. The first prototype using all the components is expected later this year."

 

On moving printed electronics from enabling technology to application
22 November 2011 | Printed Electronics World
by Raghu Das, CEO of IDTechEx

"IDTechEx recently visited PARC in California and learnt of its business model today, culture, and legacy pioneering technological change...among many other industry contributions.

Below, I share some updates on what IDTechEx has been observing at PARC. Taken together, these updates convey an important movement beyond the enabling materials, processes, equipment, and components."

 

Researchers Couple Printed Logic with Printed Memory
The device processes only small amounts of data, but at a very low cost.
26 October 2011 | Technology Review
by Kate Greene

"Printed electronics have been advancing in bits and pieces for years -- a crude processor here, a basic memory device there. Now researchers at PARC and the Norwegian company Thinfilm Electronics have announced a printed electronic device that, for the first time, marries transistors with memory.

...Earlier this year, Thinfilm showed off a handheld device capable of reading cards printed with circuits that store 20 bits of data.  In May, the company announced engineering deals with two major toy manufacturers who plan to use its printable memory.

...The prototype is a 'building block' that can be used for a number of different applications, says Raghu Das, CEO of IDTechEx, a research firm. 'There has been a huge effort on printing transistors globally,' Das says, 'but very poor effort on making useful building blocks like this, which can be used horizontally for many applications.' The announcement by PARC and Thinfilm, he says, is 'very good news.'"