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Glenn Edens in the news

 

 

Making the Internet Safe for Gadgets
2 October 2013 | Communications of the ACM
by Tom Geller

"People have predicted the Internet's death by traffic since its origin. Small protocol changes have prevented congestive collapse throughout the years, even as the Internet's fundamental host-to-host structure has remained unchallenged. But that may need to change soon, as an increasing number of sensors, phones, and other mobile devices connecting to the Internet threaten the network's security and reliability."

"One family of emerging solutions focuses on the purpose and content of data, rather than on where it lives. The approach is known as information-centric networking (ICN), a topic in which "there are easily two or three dozen projects going on," according to Glenn Edens, research director in the Computer Science Laboratory at PARC. His group has developed a protocol specification of ICN named Content-Centric Networking (CCN), and with it an open-source reference implementation, CCNx. "That codebase is used by a couple of hundred institutions," said Edens. "It's been ported to around three dozen architectures that we know of. Today, it is running on everything from Raspberry Pis and BeagleBoards and tiny home routers, all the way up to really large cloud switches."

 

A Rewired Internet Would Speed Up Content Delivery
29 October 2012 | MIT Technology Review
by Tom Simonite

"A growing number of researchers think it's time to rewire the Internet. A fundamentally new approach could better serve the streaming video, nonstop connectivity, and sizable downloads that users have come to expect, these experts say.

The problem is simple: the Internet was designed to send small packets of data back and forth in a conversational style, says Glenn Edens, who heads networking research at PARC. “Where we are today, the Internet is mostly used for the distribution of content like video, pictures, and e-mails,” says Edens, who is leading an effort at PARC to design and test an alternative way of operating the Internet known as content-centric networking—a project that is attracting increasing support from other researchers and companies."