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Eugene Chow in the news

 

 

Xerox Could Blow Open Concentrating Solar Power Field With New Printer
5 April 2016 | CleanTechnica
by Tina Casey

Concentrating solar tech has been getting the stinkeye from some industry observers, with the main beefs being high complexity and high costs compared to conventional solar panels. Nevertheless, the US Energy Department has made a national showpiece out of five gigantic utility-scale thermal solar power plants, and last year the agency threw some grant dollars at Xerox’ cutting edge PARC company to work on the micro-scale, photovoltaic end of the concentrating solar field. The PARC micro-scale concentrating solar project aims at whittling down both the cost and complexity of concentrating solar power, by integrating tiny hexagonal solar elements directly into a flat panel.

 

Xerox PARC Working on Cheaper Photovoltaics
30 March 2016 | Energy Manager Today
by Carl Weinschenk

The MIT Technology Review reports that researchers at Xerox PARC are working on a digital printing process that could reduce the cost of mass producing concentrated photovoltaic systems. The process could increase efficiency dramatically by using lenses to concentrate the light onto small cells in the panel.

Solar energy is growing in low- and middle-income communities, according to GreenBiz. The organization cites a study from Kevala Research to make the claim.

 

A Xerox Machine for Super Solar Panels
Researchers at PARC are working on a way to cheaply print efficient solar cells at a large scale
25 March 2016 | MIT Technology Review
by Mike Orcutt

The technology giant that’s synonymous with photocopied documents has set its sights on highly efficient solar panels.
 
Researchers at PARC, an R&D-focused subsidiary of Xerox, say they’re developing a new digital printing process that could make it much cheaper to mass-produce concentrated solar photovoltaic systems. Such systems can dramatically increase the efficiency of solar cells by using lenses to concentrate and focus the sunlight onto small cells.

 

DARPA Picks 10 to Build Nano-based Products
7 January 2016 | Defense Systems
by George Leopold

Ten research organizations have been tapped by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop technologies and processes for assembling nano-scale building blocks for materials and millimeter-scale components.

DARPA announced the awards at the end of December under its "Atoms to Products" (A2P) initiative designed to leverage unique "atomic-scale" characteristics like much lower melting points and greater heat resistance.

Boston University, Notre Dame, HRL and PARC form a working group on optical meta-material assembly. One initiative calls for Boston University researchers to develop a technique to "spray paint" atoms with nano-scale precision to build tunable optical meta-materials for the "photonic battlefield."

 

Chips off the Old Block
Borrowing from photocopier technology, researchers find a way to make an electronics printer
6 December 2014 | The Economist
by Paul Markillie

"PRINTING has come a long way since Johannes Gutenberg perfected the commerical use of the printing press around 1439.  Since then, movable type has given way to other processes, such as lithography and screen printing.  In the digital era, laser, and inkjet printers arrived.  Then 3D printers emerged to make solid objects by building up layers of material.  What would be nice is a machine that could also print the electronics that go into devices.  Now one group of researchers has succeeded in demonstrating how just such a machine might work."

 

Micro Chiplets
PARC's technique of mincing chips into printer ink could revolutionize the way electronics are made
8 August 2014 | MIT Technology Review
by David Talbot

"In the same research lab where the ethernet, laser printer, and graphical user interface were born, engineers are forging an entirely new way to assemble electronic devices—a technique that could be faster, cheaper, and more versatile. 

Typically, chips are made in bulk on semiconductor wafers and then cut into individual units and placed on motherboards inside computers and other devices. But researchers at PARC, in Palo Alto, California, envision doing something different with the wafers: chopping them up into hairs-width “chiplets,” mixing them into an ink, and guiding the tiny pieces electrostatically to just the right spot and orientation on a substrate, from which a roller could pick them up and print them."

 

Next Trick for Laser Printers: Manufacturing Electronics
9 April 2013 | Techonomy
by Adrienne Burke

"New York Times reporter John Markoff describes in today’s Science Times how a new technique developed at PARC will print computing power onto a flexible surface.

Demonstrating what PARC CEO Stephen Hoover wrote for Techonomy last year—that 'a lot of the opportunities we’re going to find in the ‘Internet of things’ are going to be about how to embed intelligence at very low cost in a distributed way into the world'—one potential of the technology Markoff describes is to take 3D-printing to the next level, by manufacturing not just a structure, but also its electronic functionality."

 

Tiny Chiplets: A New Level of Micro Manufacturing
8 April 2013 | The New York Times
by John Markoff

"The technology, on display at PARC, is part of a new system for making electronics, one that takes advantage of a Xerox invention from the 1970s: the laser printer.

If perfected, it could lead to desktop manufacturing plants that 'print' the circuitry for a wide array of electronic devices — flexible smartphones that won’t break when you sit on them; a supple, pressure-sensitive skin for a new breed of robot hands; smart-sensing medical bandages that could capture health data and then be thrown away...

The new manufacturing system the PARC researchers envision could be used to build custom computers one at a time, or as part of a 3-D printing system that makes smart objects with computing woven right into them...if the PARC researchers are successful, they will have thrown out 50 years of Silicon Valley conventional wisdom."

 

Tiny Springs Could Reduce Microchip Waste
A new manufacturing approach could end the junking of several chips when one fails.
13 July 2010 | Technology Review
by Tom Simonite

"For now, the collaborators are developing their springy approach for the high-performance processors used in supercomputers or high-end servers. These chips are combined in closely packed groups known as multichip modules. Such modules need the processors to be packed closely together in order to speed the transfer of signals between them...They showed that their approach works on a test chip from Oracle that simulates the electrical and thermal behavior of a high-end processor."