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Raj Apte in the news

 

 

Churchill Club: PARC at 40 and the business, innovation intersection [podcast]
Between the Lines
26 November 2010 | ZDNet
by Larry Dignan

"In this latest installment of the Churchill Club podcast series, a panel talks about 40 years of the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) and innovation lessons. Over the past 40 years, PARC has made a profound impact on innovation in the Valley and beyond. The birthplace of the GUI and the Ethernet, today the halls of PARC are walked by scientists making breakthroughs in clean tech, the newest phase of networking, and other commercially impactful products. As we look forward to the next 40 years, what has changed in innovation? Have we—and even can we—learn from our past? Can business and innovation co-exist? And what is next?"

 

PARC celebrates its 40 years of Silicon Valley innovation
23 September 2010 | CNET News
by Daniel Terdiman

"Most people who spoke up on the topic seemed to agree that the secret sauce that made PARC so successful was its highly talented employees."...

"These days, eight years after its 2002 spin-off, PARC is no longer serving Xerox exclusively but is still very much in the middle of the future of technology. According to Tamara St. Claire, PARC's vice president of global business development, the research hub is deep into clean tech, biomedical engineering, and natural language processing, among others, and counts among its clients Microsoft, Dai Nippon Printing, Sun/Oracle, Samsung, NEC, and Fujitsu. Many of its other high-profile clients prefer to keep their relationship with PARC secret so as not to tip off competitors, St. Claire said."

 

Why E-Books Are Stuck in a Black-and-White World
9 June 2009 | Wired
by Priya Ganapati

"The hitch is that color e-ink technologies aren't anywhere near ready for prime time. 'People don't like color screens that are dark,' says Raj Apte, manager of prototype devices and circuits for PARC, 'and so far, the displays for e-readers we have seen lack the brightness that makes color screens attractive.'"

 

A Smarter Way to Dig Up Experts
8 April 2009 | Technology Review
by Erica Naone

"Peter Pirolli at PARC, who studies Web searching behavior, says that analyzing social networks can also reveal another type of expert: one who is good at carrying information from one specialized group to another. The ability to carry information between specialized groups can be crucial to innovation, and may be something that companies want to look for when hiring, Pirolli says. He suggests that this type of expert could be found by analyzing social networks and looking for people with strong ties to members of two distinct expert clusters."