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Craig Eldershaw in the news

 

 

New Technology could Identify and Sort Aluminum Scrap
15 June 2014 | Scrap

Did you ever wish there were a fast, easy, and cost-effective way to sort high-grade aluminum from lower grades in mixed scrap? Well so does the U.S. Department of Energy (Washington, D.C.), which gave PARC, a research subsidiary of Xerox Corp. in Palo Alto, Calif., a $1 million grant to develop new technology to identify aluminum types—along with magnesium and titanium—in metal scrap in a high-speed, reliable way that won’t cost you an arm and a leg.

The Energy Department devised the grant program because it thinks too much post-consumer scrap aluminum is being exported when it could be used in the United States for manufacturing lighter vehicles that save fuel and reduce carbon emissions, for example. In 2013, 3,480,000 mt of aluminum was recovered in the United States, and 1,872,000 mt was exported, according to estimates from the U.S. Geological Survey (Reston, Va.), the U.S. International Trade Commission (Washington, D.C.), and ISRI. But the problem, as many recyclers know, is that it can be challenging to identify and remove aluminum when it’s mixed with lower grades of scrap. Enter PARC, which was already working on such technology and is eager to apply it to the scrap recycling industry.

 

Researchers Create Printed Battery That Stores 40% More Energy
15 April 2011 | Discovery Treehugger
by Jerry James Stone

"A new manufacturing process developed by Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) will increase the energy a lithium-ion battery can store by 40%. The technology is similar to that of printed solar cells...

It seems the free gift with purchase here is not going to be shaving off the cost but extending the cars range to meet our perceived driving needs. As drivers of the Chevy Volt are already reporting 1,000 miles per tank, it will be interesting to see if PARC can change the electric car industry as they did solar."

 

PARC Battery Electrode Breakthrough
1 April 2011 | Printed Electronics World

"While the solar cell application has a near-term sales opportunity, commercial application of the technology to battery electrodes is probably 2-3 years out, Elrod noted. There is further opportunity for the method in air cathodes. The current density in an air-breathing electrode is proportional to the amount of electro-catalytic surface area that is exposed to air. The PARC technology provides a directed-assembly printing method for producing a greater proportion of this 'three-phase boundary' than conventional electrode manufacturing methods—up to 10x the air-breathing surface area of conventional electrodes."