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Peter Kiesel in the news

 

 

ARPA-E awards $43M to 19 energy storage projects to advance electric vehicle and grid technologies
2 August 2012 | Green Car Congress

"The US Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has selected 19 new projects to receive a total of $43 million to develop breakthrough energy storage technologies and support promising small businesses...

Unlike other Department of Energy efforts to push the frontiers of battery chemistry, AMPED is focused on maximizing the potential of existing battery chemistries. These innovations are intended to help reduce costs and improve the performance of next generation storage technologies, which could be applied in both plug-in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles."

 

$43 Million for Transformational Storage Projects to Advance Electric Vehicle and Grid Technologies
2 August 2012 | announcement
by ARPA-E

"The Department of Energy today announced that 19 transformative new projects will receive a total of $43 million in funding from the Department’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to leverage the nation’s brightest scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs to develop breakthrough energy storage technologies and support promising small businesses..." [download full list]

Advanced Management And Protection Of Energy-Storage Devices (AMPED)

  • Lead organization: PARC
  • Description: Smart Embedded Network of Sensors with Optical Readout (SENSOR). Palo Alto Research Center will develop new fiber optic sensors that are inserted into battery packs to monitor and measure batteries during charge and discharge cycles. These compact fiber optical sensors will measure the battery’s health while in use to avoid degradation and failure.
  • Funding: $4,018,960

 

Building a handheld HIV detector
Researchers race to bring cheap HIV testing to rural regions of developing countries.
1 April 2010 | Inside Science
by Devin Powell

Researchers at PARC "have shrunk the laser technology inside large laboratory machines down to about the size of an iPod. Their cheap, handheld device promises to provide an immune system check-up on the spot and in less than 10 minutes. The technology analyzes a small sample of blood drawn by a finger prick. 'The quality of their test is great,' said researcher Bernhard Weigl of PATH, a non-profit reviewing a variety of CD4 testing technologies. 'If you look at their graph, it pretty much looked like the graph you would get from a big instrument.' PARC's prototype cost about $250 to build, a hundred times cheaper than the large flow cytometers currently in use."