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Big Data in the news

 

 

How Big Data Could Help the U.S. Predict the Next Snowden?
12 February 2014 | DefenseOne
by Patrick Tucker

"National Intelligence Director James Clapper, at Tuesday’s Senate Armed Services Committee hearing, asserted (again) that malevolent insiders with access to top secret material, like Edward Snowden, constituted a top threat to our nation’s national security. The lawmakers agreed and pressed Clapper to explain how he was changing the practices within his office and across the intelligence community to prevent another Snowden-scale data breach. One key step that Clapper outlined: our nation’s top intelligence folks will become subject to much more surveillance in the future.

Oliver Brdiczka, a researcher at PARC, and several of his colleagues have set up a number of experiments to observe potential insider threat behavior in closed online environments. In the first of these [PDF], Brdiczka looked at the massively multiplayer online game World of Warcraft. The game, which allows users to build characters, join large organizations called guilds, and go on missions and assignments, has been in the news a bit recently after the Snowden leaks revealed that the NSA had been listening in on chat room conversations between World of Warcraft players in the hopes of catching potential terrorists."

 

Meet the 9 startups from B2B incubator 9Mile Labs
10 September 2013 | GeekWire
by John Cook

PARC helps one of the startups featured at 9Mile Labs:

"Comr.seComr.se increases eCommerce revenue by powering native transactions anywhere brands connect with their consumers.

Notes: This startup is pronounced 'commerce' — and the company is led by CEO Kyle Schei. It brings transaction-based images that companies can post directly into Facebook 'without ever leaving the social stream.' Basically, it is a shopping cart technology, which may sound like a a 90s-era innovation. But it looks cool. The service syncs with existing e-commerce infrastructure, and they 'capture transactions in new environments.' By doing so, Schei said they are expanding e-commerce around the Web, noting that they offer a 'tangible big data offering.' The company is working with Palo Alto Research Center to show how products sell throughout the Web, also helping match products with specific customers. He said the partnership with PARC is shaving a year off of development."

 

Expanding Real-Time Data Insight at PARC
1 June 2013 | Big Data
by Dina Citraro

"Today, PARC is focusing its efforts on making sense of the many new types of datasets that are being generated as a result of real-time collection. This data is often unstructured and does not easily fit into traditional analytics solutions, and PARC uses many techniques, including graph analytics, cloud
diagnostics, and contextual intelligence to be at the forefront of big data research."

 

Society's Next Big Challenge: Infinite Data
5 April 2013 | VentureBeat
by Christian Fritz

PARC's Christian Fritz contributed this article on infinite data.

"The common opportunistic nature of 'big data' implies that the question is more flexible than the data that can be used, which is fixed. If you reverse this — fix the question and accept flexibility in the data — then it now defines 'infinite data.'"



 

Nebula Builds a Cloud Computer for the Masses
2 April 2013 | Bloomberg Businessweek
by Ashlee Vance

"PARC has three Nebula Ones, which it uses for research projects such as an effort to improve parking in big cities. Researchers at PARC have been analyzing huge amounts of data to create models that show when workers, delivery vehicles, and shoppers tend to use certain parking spots. The idea is to create parking spots with modifiable, electronic signs that can turn, say, loading zones into regular parking spots over the course of a day."

 

Nebula launches its OpenStack “system”
2 April 2013 | GigaOM
by Barb Darrow

"PARC has beta tested the Nebula One system for months (running with ZT servers). The research facility is predisposed to OpenStack because it prefers open source technologies and it went with Nebula because it wanted to minimize time and energy spent on set up.

'We don’t want to do too much of the plumbing [work.] All that racking and stacking takes a lot of time. We want to push one button and deploy on demand,' said Surendra Reddy, CTO for cloud and big data futures at PARC."

 

Ex-NASA Tech Boss Crams Cloud Into Box
2 April 2013 | Wired
by Cade Metz

"According to Surendra Reddy — a chief technology officer at PARC who once ran the cloud services inside Yahoo — this sort of appliance can significantly reduce the number of people needed to setup and maintain such a service...

...the device connects to ordinary servers from the likes of Dell, HP, and IBM. 'With Nebula,' says PARC’s Roger Hoover, 'most of your infrastructure is still commodity hardware.' It’s a little different from the massive — and massively expensive — server appliances currently offered by the likes of Oracle and Cisco."

 

Cassidy: PARC still in the business of innovation 10 years after Xerox spinoff
12 July 2012 | San Jose Mercury News
by Mike Cassidy

"PARC, once known as Xerox PARC, was spun out as a subsidiary of Xerox in 2002. For the past decade it's been responsible for its own bottom line, and it's been expected to turn a profit. It was a change from the days that PARC served one master: Xerox. Now, Hoover says, less than half the lab's work is for Xerox; the rest involves projects for other companies and government agencies. …PARC's independence means that its 180 scientists and technologists can't simply come up with ideas that are world-shattering, mind-bending and brilliant. A good portion of them have to be things that PARC and companies working with PARC can sell -- and in the near-term. Profit vs. blue-sky research: It's one of the oldest balancing acts among the research lab crowd.

...All that said, Hoover is determined to make sure that PARC researchers keep reaching for the next big thing that nobody has thought of yet. Yes, the lab has identified core areas that guide its research, including health and wellness, big data, cleantech, printed electronics, networking and innovation services. But, Hoover says, as much as 25 percent of its research investments are spent on projects outside the core areas, allowing scientists to stumble onto unforeseen breakthroughs."

 

Data 2.0 Summit Explores the Big Data, Social Data, and Open Data Revolution
...speakers from over 80 companies discuss why cloud data is the next $100 billion dollar industry.
2 April 2012 | release
by Data 2.0 Summit

"Highlighting the Data 2.0 Summit are speakers including: Jim Fowler, Co-Founder of Jigsaw.com (now Data.com); Bram Cohen, founder of BitTorrent; Gil Elbaz, founder and CEO of Factual; as well as executives from PARC (a Xerox Company), 10gen, Hadoop, DataStax, Intuit, Dun & Bradstreet, RapLeaf, GNIP, Mashery, RadiumOne, Kaggle, Cloudera, MTV Networks, Experian, Bizo, BlueKai, and Walmart Labs."

 

Digitized Decision Making and the Hidden Second Economy
Techonomy [invited/ guest contributed]
10 November 2011 | Forbes
by Stephen Hoover

"There’s something big happening right now. I’m not referring to any of the popular technology memes per se—big data, social, cloud, mobile, augmented reality, context, post-PC devices, consumerization, 3-D printing, etc. I’m referring to something behind, and beyond, all of these technologies: the digitization of decision making. This increasing trend is creating a 'second economy' underneath and alongside the physical economy we know so well, and on a revolutionary scale…

[PARC visiting researcher and Santa Fe Institute external professor W. Brian] Arthur argues that this second economy, which author Nick Carr in turn dubs the age of 'deep automation,' may represent the biggest shift since the Industrial Revolution, and lead to increases in productivity output as well as decreases in physical jobs.

...Since joining PARC, a Xerox company approaching its 10-year anniversary as a business for open innovation with multiple clients, I have been focused on the following question: just what will happen to invention and innovation in this second economy? More specifically, what will be the role of R&D and innovation organizations in a new global innovation landscape?"