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Polyethylene glycol deposition techniques for antifouling surfaces: using antistiction to conserve bioparticles for recovery and analysis

 

For bioparticle analysis within microfluidic devices, there is a risk of analytes adhering to surfaces, thereby compromising particle manipulation and recovery. To address this we have implemented polyethylene glycol (PEG)-type coatings by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and plasma-polymerizing deposition techniques. Silane chemistry is used to deposit SAM films directly onto silicon dioxide surfaces, and in a special case for which a composite of metallic arrays and SiON within our MEMS device must be coated, an ultrathin layer of sputtered Si is added before the SAM protocol. We have also deposited PEG-like tetraglyme by plasma-polymerization onto substrates using an onsite-built reactor to provide antistiction treatment to all surfaces, including those that do not have chemical compatibility for the SAM technique. Three tests demonstrate the effectiveness of our surface treatments: static exposure to microbial suspensions, bioparticle transport across MEMS traveling-wave (TW) arrays, and bioparticle recovery from a circulating flow device. Our static microbial assays show significant reduction in B. thuringiensis adhesion to both the SAM and plasma-polymerized coatings and reduction in B. globigii adhesion to the plasma-polymerized coating. Our TW arrays, when coated with either the SAM or plasma-polymerized PEG film, are effective at reducing adhesion to polystyrene beads as well as both Bacillus species. Lastly, our bioparticle recovery, as gauged by spectrophotometry, improves by as much as one order of magnitude when we coat flow chambers with our plasma-polymerized film.

 
citation

Chang, N. E. ; Lean, M. ; Limb, S. Polyethylene glycol deposition techniques for antifouling surfaces: using antistiction to conserve bioparticles for recovery and analysis. Materials Research Society Fall 2006 Meeting; 2006 November 27 - December 1; Boston MA.