homeresources & publicationsby focus area › metamaterial devices and applications

 

Metamaterial Devices and Applications

view by:  date | title | type

 

Sense and Avoid "M-FAST" Technology for Drones

PARC is developing M-FAST (Metamaterial Frequency-Adaptive Steerable Technology) -- a low cost, low size, weight, and power (SWaP), electronically scanned array adapted for 360° scanning and tracking of multiple small unmanned aircraft systems (SUAS) threats and objects. At its core, M-FAST consists of an array of tunable metamaterial elements, with a 120° field of view, which steers and shapes RF beams. M-FAST is a low-complexity platform compared to other traditional phased arrays or electronically scanned arrays. Additionally, M-FAST’s all-electronic platform is controlled by computationally lightweight algorithms.

2016

Metamaterial Devices & Applications

25 July 2016

Metamaterials (i.e., engineered electromagnetic structures), are poised to disrupt industries, create entirely new markets, and change society. The ability to design and fabricate materials with new functionalities opens the door to a new world of possibilities ¾it is now possible to realize Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak and optical black holes, which we once thought was impossible. Beyond the realms of science fiction, metamaterials can be tailored to either augment the functionality of existing devices or create new devices with superior performances.

Metamaterials-Enabled Passive Radiative Cooling Films

17 February 2016

PARC is developing massively scalable and low-cost metamaterial films that can “self-cool” in broad daylight, without the need for electricity or consumption of water. The focus of the ARPA-E project is in dissipating heat loads to increase thermal power plant efficiency, especially in conjunction with other dry cooling approaches.

2015

Spectrally-Selective Metamaterials for Thermophotovoltaics

1 January 2015

PARC is developing a spectrally-selective metamaterial emitter with an engineered emission spectrum that matches the spectral response of a low-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cell (e.g. made of GaSb), allowing for an efficient way to convert heat directly and efficiently to electricity.