home › clients & industry contributions

SPOTLIGHTS:

clients & industry contributions

view by: company | date

47 items firstPreviousprev12

 

Due to the confidentiality of most of our client relationships and work, below is a partial, public list of "the company we keep". This list includes enterprise and recent startup clients, as well as past and other spinoffs, spinouts, licensees, and ventures with PARC contributions. 

To see a list of clients and at-a-glance overview of PARC today, please download our fact sheet.


 

 

consumer electronics

P&G
consumer electronics

P&G, the world's largest consumer products company, is a recognized leader in open innovation, developing external partnerships through its Connect+Develop program with the aim of accelerating the rate and efficiency of innovation delivery. When P&G identified compelling growth opportunities in the areas of consumer electronics, it also recognized the need for additional expertise beyond in-house capabilities to help deliver on those opportunities. PARC brought to the table a breadth of expertise and ability to innovate within industry constraints and market economics. Together, P&G and PARC have worked on prototype development, technology evaluation, and product roadmapping.

related:

 

 

object-oriented programming

ParcPlace Systems / ObjectShare / acquired by Cincom Systems
object-oriented programming

The Smalltalk-80 object-oriented programming language was commercialized through ParcPlace Systems in 1988. Smalltalk was the first object-oriented programming language with an integrated user interface, overlapping windows, integration documents, and cut-and-paste editor. ParcPlace became ObjectShare in 1997, and its VisualWorks business unit was acquired by Cincom Systems in 1999.

 

 

web-based meeting & presentation solution

Placeware / acquired by Microsoft
web-based meeting & presentation solution

PARC's research on how a sense of place can create more meaningful interaction on the Internet resulted in the spin-out Placeware in 1996. The company provided users with a live, web-based presentation solution for field and customer communication, becoming the largest Internet meeting solutions provider. Placeware was acquired by Microsoft in 2003 to become Microsoft Office LiveMeeting.

 

 

networking as a service (NaaS)

PowerCloud Systems / acquired by Comcast
networking as a service (NaaS)

PARC spin-out PowerCloud Systems is a leading software platform provider for enabling Networking as a Service (NaaS). The technology underpinning its CloudCommand platform was developed at PARC, and is supported by 10 patents in areas ranging from cloud-virtualized network controllers to usable security. PowerCloud Systems' investors include Walden Venture Capital and Javelin Venture Partners, as well as Qualcomm Ventures, which led the most recent financing round.

related:

 

 

natural language search

Powerset / acquired by Microsoft
natural language search

Powerset, Inc. and PARC signed an exclusive deal in 2007 to develop and commercialize breakthrough search engine technology in consumer search -- leveraging more than three decades of PARC's research and technology refinement in natural language understanding. Microsoft acquired Powerset in 2008.

related:

 

 

future networking technology

Samsung
future networking technology

Building on their relationship from other joint hardware and software projects over the past 5 years, Samsung & PARC recently entered into a new engagement targeted at advancing the state of the art in future communications and networking technologies. PARC is one of the partners of Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, focused on helping the company achieve its mission of leading the digital convergence movement.

related:

 

 

image decoding

ScanSoft / Nuance
image decoding

PARC technology for document image processing was part of Xerox Imaging Systems (founded in 1980, later ScanSoft in 1999) award-winning digital imaging software. ScanSoft was acquired by scanner software product developer Visioneer (1992), which then became ScanSoft and acquired/merged with SRI spinoff Nuance in 1995. Nuance Communications today is a leading provider of speech and imaging applications -- including embedded speech recognition, optical character recognition software, and desktop imaging software.

related:

 

 

Semaphore Communications
network encryption

Semaphore Communications was spun out in 1990 to bring advanced encryption systems for networks technology to the marketplace. A distinguishing feature of this technology was performing encryption in the hardware, which made it faster than most software-based products.

 

 

mobile telepresence

Sony
mobile telepresence

Leading technology and entertainment company Sony Corporation worked with PARC to strengthen its capabilities in developing products. The company wanted to gain a deeper understanding of customer practices and uncover unmet needs in the area of mobile telepresence. PARC ethnographers identified an emerging multi-connected content-sharing and communication phenomenon, which they dubbed "channel blending", and recommended specific technology opportunities for Sony to take advantage of it.

related:

 

 

solid-state lasers

Spectra Diode Labs / merged with JDS Uniphase
solid-state lasers

Based on PARC's distributed feedback/ "solid state" laser using gallium arsenide (GaAs), Spectra Diode Labs, Inc. (SDLI) -- a joint venture between Xerox and Spectra-Physics -- was formed in 1983 to develop high-power, state-of-the-art, solid-state semiconductor laser diodes. SDLI and JDS Uniphase merged in 2001.

 

 

StepperVision / acquired by Optical Associates
wafer processing

StepperVision was spun off in 1987 to market a monitoring device that specified optimal settings for semiconductor equipment called "wafer steppers". The technology was developed by PARC to speed up silicon wafer alignment during the lithographic process in the wafer line used for experimental integrated circuit designs. Optical Associates, Inc. acquired StepperVision in 1988.

 

 

interconnects for high-speed servers

Sun Microsystems / acquired by Oracle
interconnects for high-speed servers

To maintain a competitive advantage in their high-speed, high-end server market, Sun Microsystems, Inc. engaged PARC in co-development and ongoing collaboration around PARC's ClawConnect technology. 

related:

 

 

Ethernet fiber optics

SynOptics / Bay Networks / acquired by Nortel
Ethernet fiber optics

PARC developed an Ethernet system that could operate on an optical cabling system. This resulted in the 1985 spin out of SynOptics Communications, Inc., which pioneered the use of Ethernet networking technology over phone wire in buildings. The company became Bay Networks in 1994, and was acquired by Nortel in 1998.

 

 

printed memory with logic

Thin Film Electronics
printed memory with logic

Thin Film Electronics ASA ("Thinfilm") is working with PARC to develop next-generation printed memory solutions that combine Thinfilm's memory products with PARC's printed thin-film transistor technology. Complementing each other's strengths to move the industry beyond components and towards consumer-facing applications, the two companies recently announced they produced a working prototype of the world's first printed non-volatile memory device addressed with complementary organic circuits (the organic equivalent of CMOS circuitry). This demonstration is a significant milestone toward the mass production of low-cost, low-power ubiquitous devices that are a key component of the "Internet of Things".

related:

 

 

portable document reader

Uppercase / acquired by Microsoft
portable document reader

Uppercase, Inc. was spun out in 1998 to commercialize one of PARC's ubiquitous computing research results: a thin, lightweight, pen-based, page-oriented, network-accessible portable document-reading device (PDR) for mobile professionals. The technology was acquired by Microsoft in 2000.

 

 

VLSI ASIC technology

VLSI Technologies / acquired by Philips Electronics / NXP Semiconductors
VLSI ASIC technology

The very-large-scale integration (VLSI) methodologies were developed at PARC by Doug Fairbairn and Lynn Conway with California Institute of Technology's Carver Mead. Fairbairn co-founded VLSI Technologies, Inc. in 1979 to become the pioneer of application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology. In 1999, VLSI was acquired by Philips Electronics and is part of Philips spin-off NXP Semiconductors.

 

 

laser printing & more

Xerox
laser printing & more

Over the years, PARC has delivered lasting value to Xerox -- for example, laser printing became a multibillion-dollar business for Xerox. PARC is also the birthplace of Xerox's DocuPrint network printing software, the dual-beam lasers used in many Xerox products, and the scheduling software for the Xerox iGen3 Digital Production Press. Xerox continues to embed relevant PARC technology into its product and espectially its service offerings via its acquired company ACS, now known as Xerox Services.

related:

 

47 items firstPreviousprev12

 

show industry contributions by focus area

show industry contributions by type

 

"At Procter & Gamble, we have a number of strategies and programs in place for working with outside innovation partners. Our aim is to find and build partnership with companies – institutions that complement and expand our own capabilities  so together we can achieve more. With PARC, we found broad-based, deep technical knowledge, a variety of key skills in a single place, and a successful track record of working with industry partners. They understand our business and are very responsive to client needs  very important as we try to accelerate our growth." — Ed Sawicki, Associate Director, P&G Global Business Development

 

"By partnering with an outside institution like PARC, it forced us to consider ideas that might have been dismissed had they been born internally." — Hitoshi Matsumoto, President, Fujitsu Laboratories America

 

"We are pleased with how smoothly the two companies worked together to develop a partnering arrangement that aligns the long-term interests of both, as well as capture opportunities for government funding not typically available to a startup." Brad Wurtz, CEO, Power Assure