Molecular Electronics: Defect Tolerance, Chemical Fabrication and Quantum-State Switching

Details

Event

George E. Pake Auditorium 2002-10-03

Speakers

Event

Molecular Electronics: Defect Tolerance, Chemical Fabrication and Quantum-State Switching

Economic and physics considerations indicate that the rapid improvements we have come to expect in silicon integrated circuits may saturate around the year 2010. However, fundamental physical laws indicate that it should be possible to compute with a power efficiency that is at least one billion times better than present transistor electronics. The most straightforward ways currently known to achieve such efficiencies are to fabricate circuits with much smaller dimensions and fewer transistors. Thus, there is a tremendous business incentive and scientific challenge to invent new electronic devices that will have dimensions of the order of nanometers and new fabrication techniques that can inexpensively produce and connect these devices in vast quantities. In order to satisfy both requirements simultaneously, we have assembled a trans-disciplinary team of chemists, physicists, engineers and computer scientists at HP Labs to explore the use of molecules as active electronic devices in specially designed defect-tolerant architectures that are assembled by chemical processes.

Additional information

Focus Areas

Our work is centered around a series of Focus Areas that we believe are the future of science and technology.

FIND OUT MORE
Licensing & Commercialization Opportunities

We’re continually developing new technologies, many of which are available for¬†Commercialization.

FIND OUT MORE
News

PARC scientists and staffers are active members and contributors to the science and technology communities.

FIND OUT MORE